Search for:

Japan Airlines Completes Trial of Unconnected In-flight Mobile Device Meal Ordering Software

Japan Airlines is one of two carriers that has now trialed the use of a P2P mobile device software developed by Ditto. (Ditto)

Japan Airlines (JAL) has completed a pilot project testing the use of a real-time database that allows passenger mobile devices to synchronize data in real-time “even without internet connectivity,” according to Ditto, the California-based startup that provides the database.

The pilot involved JAL flight attendants and passengers trialing the use of Ditto’s software for in-flight meal ordering via mobile devices that the company emphasizes can be performed with no internet connectivity.  JAL trialed the software on 12 flights involving more than 60 flight attendants using Apple iPads to trace passenger orders in real-time throughout the duration of each flight.

“Ditto offers a software development kit (SDK) that a developer embeds into an application, such as an airline’s passenger app, and then it automatically manages the Wi-Fi and Bluetooth radios to connect to other devices peer-to-peer,” Adam Fish, CEO and co-founder of Ditto, told Avionics International. This means airlines don’t need to install any hardware—Ditto can connect crew devices to other crew and to passengers using Bluetooth and [peer-to-peer] P2P Wi-Fi of the mobile devices onboard. The core technology of Ditto is our replicated database that automatically syncs over any available network.”

According to their website, the SDK that was provided to JAL is Ditto’s “Small Peer,” that comes equipped with an embedded database to ensure that the mobile devices that the SDK is running on will always be able to read and write data, using a series of communication techniques “Bluetooth Low Energy, P2P Wi-Fi and Local Area Network.”

Ditto provides this visual overview of its Big Peer cloud database that helps enable its real-time database for mobile device-to-device communications. (Ditto)

Separately, Ditto also manages a Big Peer, its cloud database, and a series of nodes that host HTTP APIs, webhooks, and other real-time synchronization mechanisms for enabling data sharing between devices.

“For in-flight ordering, Ditto offers pre-built software called SkyService which airlines can use directly or customize as building blocks. JAL’s trial used this. Alternatively, other airlines use SkyService just as a guide on how they can build the ordering into their own apps. SkyService contains a crew application which allows the crew to chat, coordinate tasks, manage the menu and inventory and process orders,” Fish said.

JAL flight attendants using Ditto’s software to track in-flight meal orders.

Etihad Airways has also trialed the use of Ditto’s cross-platform database. In an April 21 press release, the Middle Eastern carrier notes that their flight crew evaluated the use of Ditto to “communicate with each other in real-time in a socially distanced manner and also digitally record guests’ meal orders in Business Class, replacing the current paper-based ordering method.”

According to Etihad, “if successful,” they believe they could eventually replace printed menus and allow passengers to order in-flight meals directly on their mobile devices.

Disney Lo, assistant manager for JAL’s Information Technology Planning Department, told Avionics that the airline is enthusiastic about exploring new technologies “that allow us to do our jobs to the best of our ability.”

JAL flight attendants trialed the use of Ditto’s software on 60 flights. (JAL)

“We see the great potential of Ditto’s technology which helps us elevate our service to the next level by improving the communication quality in the cabin environment. Our crew members are excited to see a seamless working environment, providing better flight experience to our passengers. We are expecting to realize digital mobilization with this technology in the future,” Lo said.

First established in 2018, Fish said that Ditto’s software has also been used in quick-service restaurant point of sales systems, robotics, defense, and education applications.

Fish said that Ditto has other similar trials in the works that will eventually be launched with several European and U.S. airlines next year.

 

 

The post Japan Airlines Completes Trial of Unconnected In-flight Mobile Device Meal Ordering Software appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

European and US Regulators Discuss Latest Efforts to Integrate Unmanned Aircraft into Civilian Airspace

Speakers from the FAA, PANSA, and EASA discussed existing regulations for drones and integrating unmanned aircraft in cities with public safety in mind. (Photo credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky)

A live webcast hosted by the Science and Technology Innovation Program (STIP) this week covered regulatory efforts to integrate commercial drones into the existing European and U.S. airspace systems. Discussion centered around educating members of the public without a background in aviation to ensure safety in recreational drone operations, assessing risks when developing regulations, and prioritizing sustainability to increase community acceptance.

The three featured speakers at the “Sharing the Air: EU and US Efforts to Integrate Commercial Drones into Civilian Airspace” webcast included Sabrina Saunders-Hodge, Acting Deputy Executive Director of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Office at the FAA; Maria Algar Ruiz, Drone Programme Manager of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA); and Janusz Janiszewski, CEO of the Polish Air Navigation Services Agency (PANSA).

According to the Wilson Center website, where the live event was featured, the ongoing evolution of commercial drone operations necessitates integrating air traffic management (ATM) with unmanned air traffic management (UTM) as well as considering the existing aviation rules for drones in the development of future regulations.

Saunders-Hodge brought up the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 14, part 107 guidelines—commonly known as the “small UAS rule”—which authorizes operation of unmanned aircraft less than 55 pounds within the visual line of sight. She explained that though it is viewed as a commercial rule, those operating drones for recreational purposes can also operate under these guidelines. Part 107, which went into effect in 2016, “did not permit small unmanned aircraft operations at night or over people without a waiver” (FederalRegister.gov). However, the amendment that went into effect in March 2021 “now permits routine operations over people and over moving vehicles, and at night under certain conditions,” according to Saunders-Hodge. 

Janusz Janiszewski remarked that a regulatory framework is one of the most important components in the aviation ecosystem. “As the air navigation service provider, as the CEO of PANSA, I have to give airspace users the proper tools and systems to use the drones in a safe manner not only to fulfill the regulations in place but also to describe difficult situations in a very simple way.”

Janiszewski discussed PANSA’s UTM system for coordinating UAV flights, which had recorded 600,000 check-ins from drone users in 2021 as of the end of November. He predicted that there will be an increasing numbers of drones in urban areas in the next five years, and there is much to be done to facilitate the integration process. “We need to have the ground infrastructure which allows us to track every user in the airspace. Then, we need to have the UAV traffic management systems. We need algorithms to manage high-flown drones. With such solutions, with cooperation, with risk mitigation, we will create the whole ecosystem, integrating the drones.” Once all of this is in place, he explained, the drones will become part of our daily lives. 

“As excitement and enthusiasm builds around drones, and the regulatory framework continues to take shape, businesses and consumers alike are looking to buy drones for commercial and personal uses. These prospective operators want to fly, and fly safely. But many don’t realize that just because you can easily and quickly buy drones, it doesn’t mean you can fly it anywhere or for any purpose.” (knowbeforeyoufly.org)

“Are these things really safe?” Richard Whittle, the moderator of this webcast, asked for comments on the importance of public acceptance. “There’s a lot of public misunderstanding about how great the risks are. There have been a number of cases of hobby drone flyers getting too close to commercial aircraft. How do you assess the risk, and how are you enforcing those regulations?” asked Whittle. He also brought up a recent incident where about 200 drones performing a light show all fell out of the air; events like that can raise public concerns about the feasibility and safety of integrating unmanned aircraft into a community. 

Saunders-Hodge shared her perspective regarding public acceptance, saying that it’s critical to work slowly towards full integration to ensure safety. “The FAA has successfully allowed light shows for huge public events in the U.S., like the Super Bowl. I wouldn’t want people to take [one specific incident] as an indication that drones inherently impose a large safety risk. It’s going to take incremental steps in each community to really start weighing out the benefits for the introduction of drone use in their areas.”

In discussing safe operation of drones, which are increasingly available to the public both online and in stores, Saunders-Hodge said that it was important to consider how to educate those without an aviation background. The FAA organized an educational campaign called “Know Before You Fly” in partnership with the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, and the Consumer Technology Association. The campaign provides resources and guidance for those interested in purchasing and operating drones in order to fly them safely and responsibly.

Maria Algar Ruiz explained the regulatory framework for UAS in the EU. For operating drones beyond the visual line of sight, flying above 150 meters, or operating with a weight exceeding 25 kilograms, authorization by the national aviation authority of the relevant airspace is required in addition to a risk assessment for the specific operating category. “As soon as the risk in the specific category increases,” Ruiz explains, for medium- to high-risk cases, “the local authority may request a design verification—an assessment of certain aspect of the drone such as the flight termination system.” The design verification is performed by EASA, who will issue a design verification report. For scenarios with much higher risk, this report is no longer sufficient, and a type certificate may be required.

Whittle posed the question, “Who is studying the environmental impact of drones on birds? And is anyone evaluating the positive side—[that] using electric drones rather than gas-powered trucks might cut carbon pollution?” The European Commission is working on a Drone Strategy 2.0 “for a smart and sustainable unmanned aircraft eco-system in Europe,” according to EASA’s website. Ruiz stated that ongoing research is being performed to evaluate and establish requirements for noise levels to minimize disturbances. Although there are concerns from the public about the impact to wildlife, there are also many instances “where the use of drones has proved to be extremely beneficial for society,” such as catastrophe management, explained Ruiz. “Those cases have shown to society that drones are there to help them, and [the public is] accepting that.”

The post European and US Regulators Discuss Latest Efforts to Integrate Unmanned Aircraft into Civilian Airspace appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

American Airlines to Equip A321XLR, 787-9 Fleet with 4K In-flight Entertainment Displays

This is a computer-generated rendering of the American Airlines A321XLR aircraft that will feature the new Optiq 4K IFE screens from Thales. The new seatback IFE screens are expected to make their debut on passenger-carrying A321XLR flights in 2023. (Airbus)

American Airlines will feature a new line of 4K in-flight entertainment (IFE) seat-back screens developed by Samsung and Thales on a fleet of Airbus A321XLR and Boeing 787-9 aircraft that the Texas-based international carrier currently has on order.

American will become the launch customer of the Optiq displays that use Samsung’s proprietary Quantum Dot Light Emitting Diode (QLED) technology, a key next-generation feature of the Thales AVANT IFE system. The 4K displays are expected to make their debut in 2023 on the fleet of 50 Airbus A321XLR aircraft that American ordered in 2019, according to a Dec. 13 announcement from Thales.

The 787-9s to feature the Optiq displays are also expected to enter service in 2023, based on adjustments to American’s Boeing 787 orders that the carrier reported in its first-quarter 2021 results. A total of five Boeing 787-9s will feature the new displays.

“AVANT will be integrated with American’s high-speed connectivity system to provide digital services and real-time health monitoring & reporting,” according to Thales. American is equipping the A321s and 787s it has on order with Viasat in-flight connectivity.

Every Optiq display also features a Bluetooth connection option for passengers with Bluetooth-capable headphones. Thales first announced the new Optiq display technology as the result of a partnership with Harman International—a Stamford, Connecticut-based Samsung subsidiary that makes audio electronics—in June.

Thales first unveiled its new Optiq displays featuring Samsung’s QLED technology in June. (Thales)

Samsung describes its proprietary QLED technology as a “display device that uses quantum dots (QD), semiconductor nano-crystals which can produce pure monochromatic red, green, and blue light. Photo-emissive quantum dot particles are used in RGB filters, replacing traditional colored photoresists with a QD layer.”

In a Sept. 30 article, consumer electronics publication CNET details the fundamental differences between QLED and OLED display technology and notes that Samsung has been using quantum dots to augment its LCD television displays since 2015. The QLED TV display branding was first launched by the company in 2017.

“American Airlines has trusted Thales as an in-flight entertainment supplier for more than a decade and now to equip its new A321XLR and Boeing 787-9 aircraft with the latest AVANT IFE solution,” Yannick Assouad, Executive Vice-President Avionics, Thales said in a statement. “As air travel begins to recover, Thales continues to invest in digital innovations that create value for our customers. We’re truly excited to provide these solutions to American and its customers.”

The post American Airlines to Equip A321XLR, 787-9 Fleet with 4K In-flight Entertainment Displays appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Embraer’s Eve Receives New eVTOL Orders for Two Australian Companies

Sydney Seaplanes and Nautilus Aviation have entered into partnership with Eve Urban Air Mobility Solutions (of Embraer) to receive eVTOL aircraft. (Eve Urban Air Mobility Solutions)

Eve Urban Air Mobility Solutions, a subsidiary of Embraer, shared announcements this week about two new partnerships. Both ventures serve to accelerate electric air taxi use in Australia. The first partnership is an agreement to introduce 10 of Eve’s electric vertical take-off and landing aircraft (eVTOL) to Queensland, Australia, for operation by luxury helicopter operator Nautilus Aviation. The second partnership is with Sydney Seaplanes, which has already ordered 50 eVTOLs from Eve

Nautilus Aviation, a division of Morris Group based in Northern Australia, will employ the new eVTOLs for scenic flights over the Great Barrier Reef and other iconic tourist attractions. Morris Group intends to reach net-zero emissions by the year 2030, and beginning operations of eVTOL aircraft as soon as 2026 will help the company reach this goal, according to the founder and CEO Chris Morris.

“We believe economic success and environmental sustainability go hand-in-hand and aim to strengthen and enrich the environments in which we work. Eve’s eVTOL technology will integrate seamlessly into our operations to deliver a range of exciting zero-emission tourism experiences,” Morris said.

In addition to providing its 100% electric VTOL aircraft, the company also contributes to the air traffic management, safety standards, and training and support with its product suite.

Sydney Seaplanes, founded in 2005, has performed over 80,000 flights to date and intends to operate all-electric aircraft as soon as 2024. (Eve Urban Air Mobility Solutions)

On Australia’s southeastern coast, Sydney Seaplanes has operated its aircraft since 2005 as a tourism service out of Sydney Harbour. The company hopes to commence all-electric flights as early as 2024 and is planning to create Alt Air, a zero-emissions regional airline, sometime in 2022. The order for Eve’s eVTOLs will contribute significantly to the sustainability goals for local tourism and commuter flights in Sydney.

Aaron Shaw, Sydney Seaplanes’ CEO, described the benefits that this partnership will provide for Sydney in a press release, saying that it will create high-tech, zero-carbon jobs that support developing transportation and tourism. “Eve’s eVTOL technology will integrate seamlessly with our electric amphibious fleet to deliver a range of tourism and commuter journeys,” commented Shaw.

Urban air mobility (UAM) operations have potential for growth in the Greater Sydney market. Andre Stein, president and CEO of Eve Urban Air Mobility, is confident that the partnership to provide eVTOLs to Sydney Seaplanes will “improve the efficiency of movement to complement existing transport modes. Eve will support this new partnership with comprehensive solutions for aircraft operations including air traffic management solutions, maintenance, training, and other services.”

While Eve’s eVTOL aircraft were designed with UAM applications in mind, there is a concept of operations study underway in Scandinavia to explore eVTOL use in rural areas for both cargo and passenger transport. Regional Norwegian airline Widerøe’s air mobility business incubator division, Widerøe Zero, is partnering with Eve to complete this study, according to a press release from last month. Andreas Kollbye Aks, CEO of Widerøe Zero, said, “Our partnership with Eve is part of our plan to accelerate the development of sustainable aviation in Norway. We are looking forward to the expanded partnership, unlocking new opportunities to improve regional connectivity.”

The post Embraer’s Eve Receives New eVTOL Orders for Two Australian Companies appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Developing eSAF from Power-to-Liquid Technology to Achieve Decarbonization

(CLERMONT FERRAND, FRANCE. NOVEMBER 2021.)
Two experts from Air bp discuss the current state of sustainable fuel use in the aviation industry as well as predictions for its future trajectory.

eSAF, a synthetic fuel derived from renewable energy sources, looks to be an increasingly important aspect of achieving the aviation industry’s decarbonization goals—along with using numerous other pathways to produce sustainable aviation fuel (SAF). Aircraft today can incorporate up to 50% eSAF along with conventional fuel, and eSAF can easily be used as a drop-in fuel.

In their Thought Leadership series published this week, Air bp features sustainability director Andreea Moyes, along with bp’s senior advisor for hydrogen and eFuels, Peter Nowobilski, in a discussion about SAF

SAF is critical for decarbonization, and although it makes up just 1% of the supply of aviation fuel currently available on the market, its commercial use continues to increase worldwide. A report from the Air Transport Action Group about the challenge of decarbonizing the aviation industry stated: “By 2015, the first regular supply of SAF was being delivered to airports and since then a number of new production facilities have been in development or construction. Despite this progress, it is estimated that by 2025, only around 2% of total jet fuel use will be with sustainable aviation fuels.”

Moyes and Nowobilski make the point that the majority of the current SAF supply comes from limited quantities of feedstocks via a pathway of hydrotreated esters and fatty acids (also known as HEFA). Therefore, producing SAF to achieve the aviation industry’s low-carbon goals must use a variety of different pathways. One of these pathways is eSAF—the synthetic fuel that is created from renewable energy sources. 

 

Electric-powered aircraft is currently limited to short-distance journeys in part because of the substantial weight of the batteries used. Current battery cell technology is also geared towards meeting the requirements of automotive applications rather than those of electric aircraft. eVTOLs require extremely fast charging capabilities and high-power cell discharging, which requires the development of battery technology to meet their unique needs. 

To take advantage of renewable electricity in operating large aircraft and traveling long distances, the electricity generated from solar, hydro, and wind power has to be converted into a synthetic fuel such as hydrogen. To efficiently use hydrogen as aviation fuel, however, most commercial aircraft flying today would need to undergo a re-design, particularly to the propulsion system and fuel storage, because hydrogen is one-fourth as dense as traditional jet fuel.

“This is where eSAF derived from power-to-liquid (PtL) technology comes in,” write Moyes and Nowobilksi. “Renewable electricity is used to break water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen via an electrolysis process. Carbon dioxide captured from the air, or from biogenic or industrial sources, together with this hydrogen are then converted to carbon monoxide and water through the reverse water gas shift process.”

Additional hydrogen and carbon monoxide are transformed into a wax (a synthetic crude oil) through the use of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis technology. This wax is then developed into eSAF or other types of fuel. “Legislation currently allows us to use FT technology to blend eSAF by up to 50% with conventional jet fuel. It can be easily stored, transported, and distributed using existing infrastructure,” according to the article.

“A simplified view of which kinds of energy options might be able to contribute to the reduction in CO2 emissions from air transport in which time period. This generally indicates when the technology may be commercially available, but not widespread use throughout the fleet.” (Credit: Air Transport Action Group)

The main barrier to scaling up SAF and eSAF production is cost. It can be eight times more expensive to produce than traditional jet fuel. Considering that eSAF will play a large role in the future of the aviation industry, it’s even more important to invest in developing sustainable fuels. 

Moyes and Nowobilksi state, “The good news is there is already legislation in Europe that places the development of eSAF at the forefront of aviation’s sustainability agenda. Germany, for example, has agreed [on] a roadmap which will come into effect in 2026 for the development and use of eSAF for the aviation sector.”

The post Developing eSAF from Power-to-Liquid Technology to Achieve Decarbonization appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Northrop Grumman Reveals Mini-CNI System with JADC2 Capabilities for Vertical Lift Platforms

Northrop Grumman Corporation recently unveiled its Mini-Communications, Navigation, and Identification (CNI) system. It holds open architecture, in-flight connectivity capabilities for vertical lift platforms and will enable data as a strategic advantage for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2) operations.

Northrop Grumman recently demonstrated its Mini-Communications, Navigation, and Identification (CNI) system with open architecture and in-flight connectivity (IFC) capabilities for vertical lift platforms. The Mini CNI system is designed particularly to enable “data as a strategic advantage” for Joint All Domain Command and Control (JADC2) operations and to help the U.S. Army achieve Multi-Domain Operations (MDO), according to Northrop.

JADC2 is a far-reaching plan developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) to bring in joint technologies—ranging from artificial intelligence to new advanced computing tools—to build a cross-service digital architecture for future multi-domain operations. Northrop believes its communications solutions division has created a new software-defined radio system that could link vertical lift aircraft to the broader multi-domain digital architecture that DoD leadership has envisioned for the overall JADC2 concept

The Mini-CNI system is capable of “delivering current multi-level secure next-generation connectivity across domains. It is designed to [provide] resilient sensor-to-shooter links maintained through spectral awareness and frequency agility. This significantly improves data to decision timelines,” the company said in a Nov. 23 press release. “In addition, the autonomous fault detection and system reconfiguration reduces crew workload, enabling warfighters to focus on other critical JADC2 mission demands.”

The Mini-CNI system is also being capable of hosting several CNI capabilities. The plan for the following year is to add new capabilities such as new Modular Open Systems Approach (MOSA) functions as well as “integration of advanced low probability of intercept/low probability of denial communications.” The team at Northrop Grumman aims to enable support of interconnected mission demands to create a fully integrated JADC2 network.

Northrop Grumman’s Jenna Paukstis, Vice President, Communications Solutions, stated in an emailed Q&A with Avionics International that the Mini-CNI system “is designed to be platform agnostic. It is intended to support vertical lift platforms as well as fixed-wing platforms. In addition, the system has the ability to be integrated into a wide range of air, ground, and maritime platforms.”

“Northrop Grumman’s Mini-CNI offering is designed to deliver multiple networked advantages for today’s warfighters, enabling data as a strategic advantage in JADC2 operations.”

The recently completed system demonstration involved an in-the-air test on a vertical lift platform; the Mini-CNI system communicated successfully and continuously throughout the entire flight test. Paukstis explained in further detail how the system works: “Our Mini-CNI is a software-defined, multi-band, multi-waveform, multi-function radio system that simultaneously supports a variety of communications and advanced networking operations. Platform integration will use standard aircraft interfaces.”

Looking forward, Paukstis anticipates that the system will be fully certified by the U.S. government within two years.

The post Northrop Grumman Reveals Mini-CNI System with JADC2 Capabilities for Vertical Lift Platforms appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

New FAA Policy Limits Use of Automatic Landing, RNP at Airports Vulnerable to 5G Interference

The FAA has issued two new airworthiness directives requiring changes to the limitations sections of fixed and rotary wing flight manuals regarding the vulnerability of radar altimeters to 5G C-Band wireless networks. Earlier this year, FreeFlight Systems unveiled a new line of radar altimeters, including the RA-5500 pictured here, that are designed to resist 5G interference. (FreeFlight Systems)

Pilots of some fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft will be prohibited from using certain types of landing procedures such as automatic landing and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) at airports where the presence of 5G C-Band stations could cause interference to their radio altimeter—also known as radar—performance,  new airworthiness directives (AD) issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Tuesday.

The decision to publish the two ADs comes following several months of concern expressed by the FAA and advocacy groups representing every segment of the aviation industry over the deployment of 5G C-Band networks being rolled out by AT&T, Verizon, and several other cellular and wireless service providers. In November, AT&T and Verizon were among the wireless providers indicating that they planned to delay the debut of their new networks from Dec. 5 to Jan. 5, 2022, to address FAA concerns expressed by the agency in a Nov. 2 special airworthiness information bulletin.

Now, with 5G wireless broadband deployment scheduled to begin in 46 different U.S. markets next month, the FAA issued a new AD outlining specific landing and approach procedures prohibited at specific airports that are still being identified based on the coming 5G rollout.

“The FAA believes the expansion of 5G and aviation will safely co-exist. Today, we took an important step toward that goal by issuing two airworthiness directives to provide a framework and to gather more information to avoid potential effects on aviation safety equipment,” the agency said in a Dec. 7 statement.

Two ADs were published by the agency to address specific changes needed to the limitation sections of transport category fixed-wing airplane/aircraft flight manuals (AFM), and separately for rotorcraft flight manuals (RFM). AD 2021-23-12 identified the following operations requiring radio altimeters as being prohibited while operating in U.S. airspace in the presence of 5G C-band wireless broadband at airports that are still being identified:

 

  • Instrument Landing System (ILS) Instrument Approach Procedures (IAP) SA CAT I, SA CAT II, CAT II, and CAT III
  • Required Navigation Performance (RNP) Procedures with Authorization Required (AR), RNP AR IAP
  • Automatic Landing operations
  • Manual Flight Control Guidance System operations to landing/head-up display (HUD) to touchdown operation
  • Use of Enhanced Flight Vision System (EFVS) to touchdown under 14 CFR 91.176(a)

 

The agency plans on naming the identified airports in upcoming Notices to Air Missions (NOTAMs). Separately, operations determined to be prohibited for rotorcraft operators equipped with radio altimeters were identified by AD 2021-23-13, and include the following:

 

  • Performing approaches that require radio altimeter minimums for rotorcraft offshore operations. Barometric minimums must be used for these operations instead.
  • Engaging hover autopilot modes that require radio altimeter data.
  • Engaging Search and Rescue (SAR) autopilot modes that require radio altimeter data.
  • Performing takeoffs and landings in accordance with any procedure (Category A, Category B, or by Performance Class in the Rotorcraft Flight Manual or Operations Specification) that requires the use of radio altimeter data.

 

In the two directives, the FAA states that its urgency in issuing the directives is based on a study published by the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) in October 2020 on the possible impacts of 5G interference with commercial aviation. However, aviation companies have been warning the FAA about the danger posed by 5G transmissions occurring in the 3.7–3.98 GHz frequency range since at least 2017 per a Nov. 18 letter by aviation companies and interest groups to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC).

The modern standard for commercial and civil aircraft is the frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar altimeter. Based on the RTCA study and analyses submitted by radio altimeter manufacturers, the FAA ultimately determined that “at this time, no information has been presented that shows radio altimeters are not susceptible to interference caused by C-Band emissions permitted in the United States.”

The AD also acknowledges C-Band wireless broadband network deployment that has already occurred in some other countries where “temporary technical, regulatory, and operational mitigations on C-Band systems have been implemented while aviation authorities complete their safety assessments.”

FAA officials determined that the two ADs affect 6,834 airplanes and 1,828 helicopters registered to operate in the U.S. Changes outlined by the directives are estimated to cost $85 per aircraft/helicopter. The revisions are required to occur on or before Jan. 4, 2022.

The post New FAA Policy Limits Use of Automatic Landing, RNP at Airports Vulnerable to 5G Interference appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Archer Receives Special Airworthiness Certificate from FAA to Begin Flight Testing

Archer’s Maker aircraft is on track to start flight tests by the end of 2021 after having received its Special Airworthiness Certificate from the FAA.
Archer has also achieved its MIDO Certificate of Authorization (COA) and Aircraft Limitations, as well as its signed and approved FAA G-1 Issue Paper: Certification Basis (“G-1 Certification Basis”).

Archer Aviation announced last week that the FAA has presented them with their Special Airworthiness Certificate. This certification comes just a few weeks after the company received its Certificate of Authorization (COA) and Aircraft Limitations and is on track to begin flight testing of its Maker aircraft by the end of the year. 

Additionally, Archer hit another significant benchmark this year when the company received its signed and approved FAA G-1 Issue Paper: Certification Basis (“G-1 Certification Basis”).

Receipt of the Special Airworthiness Certificate authorizes off-ground operations once an aircraft has met all FAA safety requirements. Achieving this milestone was key for enabling Archer to continue its mission to launch commercial electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) flights in 2024 in its launch partner cities, Los Angeles and Miami. The company is in talks with other cities in the U.S. for expanding its urban air mobility platform.

A representative from Archer said, in an email Q&A with Avionics International, “In the coming year, we plan to continue our robust flight testing program while working closely with the FAA on subsequent certification milestones. Maker’s first hover test flight will mark the beginning of the next chapter in our advance toward bringing commercial eVTOL travel to the world, and we’re excited to build on the past year’s progress in 2022.”

Archer is one of only a few companies making eVTOLs that have fulfilled the FAA’s certification requirements in order to begin flight testing. Another unique aspect of the company is its focus on addressing urban congestion and pollution through intra-city eVTOL transportation; many other similar enterprises work towards regional and long-haul travel. 

According to Archer, they have decided to focus on transforming urban mobility in highly-populated cities because the company believes that ”eVTOL transportation represents a revolutionary solution to a problem that affects millions of people every day and is only growing worse.” 

With the demonstrator aircraft, Maker, and upcoming production aircraft, the company intends to deliver significant time savings for business and leisure travelers through an emphasis on safety and efficiency in urban environments. For example, the Maker aircraft will be able to travel up to 10 times faster than a car, over a maximum distance of 60 miles. It has net-zero carbon emissions, and the company claims that its finished product will be 100 times quieter than helicopters.

Key objectives in Archer’s long-term strategy for its eVTOL network, according to the company’s representative, include:

  1. Help curb carbon emissions.
  2. Decrease traffic and ground congestion in cities.
  3. Create a fully renewable transportation solution.
  4. Build out eVTOL fleets in Los Angeles and Miami to support a variety of transportation needs.
  5. Promote healthier communities through public and private sector collaboration.

 

 

The post Archer Receives Special Airworthiness Certificate from FAA to Begin Flight Testing appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Thales Acquires Moog’s Navigation Aids Business

With the Moog navigation aids business, Thales extends its navigation aid offerings and accesses additional “man-portable” technology, further supporting customers’ contingency air operations and evolving mobility needs. (Thales)

Thales on Monday closed its acquisition of a Moog business unit that designs, develops and manufactures ground and ship-based radio frequency navigation beacons and related antennas for commercial and military aircraft operators.

Terms of the deal, which was first announced in June, were not disclosed. The Moog Navigation Aids business is based in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has about 50 employees.

The acquisition complements Thales’ existing navigation aids and air traffic management business and provides additional man-portable technology, bolstering support for its customers’ demand for contingency and mobility needs. Thales’ customers for these systems and technologies include the Federal Aviation Administration, the Defense Department, and airports and air navigation service providers worldwide.

“The navigation infrastructure in North America is in urgent need of modernization with thousands of ground-based navigation aids operating well beyond their design life,” Todd Donovan, vice president for Thales Air Traffic Management, Americas, said in a statement. “Additionally, the DoD’s doctrine is pushing for increased mobility and ability to operate more effectively in austere environments. The acquisition of Moog’s navigation business enhances our ability to address these customer needs.”

Moog sells its navigation aids to the Navy, Marine Corps and global air navigation service providers and military forces.

The acquisition also expands the U.S. presence of Thales, which is based in Toulouse, France.

The post Thales Acquires Moog’s Navigation Aids Business appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Airflow Partners with Pipistrel for Proof-of-Concept Electric-Propulsion Aircraft

Aircraft designer and manufacturer Pipistrel partners with Airflow, maker of eSTOL aircraft, to supply motors, motor controllers, and batteries necessary for its Distributed Electric Propulsion in its proof-of-concept demonstrator aircraft.

Airflow, electric short takeoff and landing (eSTOL) aircraft company, recently announced a partnership with Pipistrel, aircraft designer and manufacturer of the world’s first and currently the only type-certified electric airplane. In this partnership, Pipistrel will supply the motors, motor controllers, and batteries for Airflow’s proof-of-concept aircraft with Distributed Electric Propulsion.

Marc Ausman, CEO and co-founder of Airflow, explained in an interview with Avionics International that this proof-of-concept project will involve modifying an existing fixed-wing aircraft design with the latest technology. “The advantage is that we can do it very quickly and very inexpensively. That will help inform the production and design of the aircraft.”

Ausman also shared that Airflow is “focused on building an aircraft that has value to commercial operators today as opposed to focusing on building a specific technology that has very limited commercial use. Customer requirements for the regional air mobility market are very important.”

The partnership with Pipistrel will take advantage of the supplier’s integrated system of motors and batteries. For the technology demonstrator aircraft, Pipistrel’s technology was a perfect fit not only because of their products available but also because of the maturity of their technology. 

“We were looking for a supplier that had the complete end-to-end system already integrated together. [Pipistrel’s products] have already been tested to work together; they’ve been engineered to work together. Pipistrel is essentially the systems integrator. That’s work we don’t have to do for the proof-of-concept aircraft,” remarked Ausman.

Pipistrel will supply motors, motor controllers, and batteries for Airflow’s proof-of-concept aircraft. AirFlow)

The development of an aircraft for the regional air mobility market, to fly both people and cargo, is a primary focus for Airflow. The company hopes to accomplish these three goals:

  • Reduce the price of a regional flight ticket by 70% 
  • Produce aircraft that operate quietly to avoid disturbing local communities
  • Ensure that the process is done sustainably

“Every year in the U.S. alone, according to the DoT, there are over 2 billion trips that are driven every year in this 50-500 mile segment, and our goal is to move those people from driving to the air to reduce congestion, to move them to a sustainable form of transportation,” Ausman said. “There are close to 5,000 small, underutilized airports in the U.S. Using the existing infrastructure in the U.S. and around the world is a huge opportunity for sustainably integrating new aircraft.”

While electric vertical take-off and landing (eVTOL) vehicles will serve urban areas for low-altitude flights less than 50 miles, Ausman wants Airflow to bring electric propulsion to the regional air mobility market for 50-to-500-mile flights with their next-generation eSTOL aircraft. “We can offer an aircraft that is technically simpler, has less regulatory risk, and is less costly to operate than an eVTOL aircraft. eSTOL represents a new generation of aircraft and manufacturers bringing in new thinking to the market, and new technology to the market,” he said.

Separately from the one-off demonstrator aircraft project, Airflow is developing the production aircraft with an entirely different set of considerations. Ausman explained, “The process has to meet very stringent requirements for our customers that will use them commercially. That aircraft is planned for FAA certification in 2025.” Initial design work is in progress, and the next step is building multiple iterations of prototypes.

The company has already announced $600M in orders from customers around the world, indicating that aircraft operators are interested in the solutions Airflow has to offer the commercial market. Airflow also recently partnered with another company, Honeywell International, to continue pushing the development of eSTOL aircraft. The partnership will explore integration of Honeywell’s IntuVue RDR-84K radar system onto Airflow’s aircraft. According to Ausman, the systems are roughly the size of a book and can be placed in multiple spots on the aircraft to provide a 360-degree view of traffic around the vehicle and ensure a higher degree of safety. This integration could serve as a basis for a detect-and-avoid system for future autonomous aircraft.

The post Airflow Partners with Pipistrel for Proof-of-Concept Electric-Propulsion Aircraft appeared first on Aviation Today.

—————
Boost Internet Speed
Free Business Hosting
Free Email Account
Dropcatch
Free Secure Email
Secure Email
Cheap VOIP Calls
Free Hosting
Boost Inflight Wifi
Premium Domains
Free Domains

Transcom ISP - Transcom VOIP - Free Secure Email - Dropcatch Software - FastApn Inflight - Aero Connect - Premium Domains